Newsroom

February 2019

Hennecke Moves Into New South Fayette Plant

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Wednesday February 20, 2019

Hennecke Moves Into New South Fayette Plant

From the Pittsburgh Business Times:

The Hennecke Group has moved into its new North American headquarters south of Pittsburgh, according to a press release from the company.

The German manufacturer of polyurethane processing equipment and plants announced last summer that it would be relocating its North American headquarters from Cecil Township to Alpine Point Business Park in South Fayette. The company is now based out of a new building that has more office and conference space, a research and development laboratory and a modern parts warehouse.

Read more from this story from Luke Torrance at the Pittsburgh Business Times here.

About The Project

The Al. Neyer design-build team began construction in late June of 2018 and broke ground on the 35,000 SF office and industrial project in July of 2018.

Al. Neyer was selected to develop and design-build the project because of its skills in creating custom industrial projects that support productivity efficiency. Hennecke had specific technical needs for electrical power and a structure that could help them maximize operations. Al. Neyer created a warehouse with a 10-foot crane, which will allow the client to customize the space to their needs. Read more about our expertise with office and industrial products in Pittsburgh here.


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